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New Coach

New Coach

Metadata

  • Author: Lis Paice
  • Full Title: New Coach
  • Category: #books

Highlights

  • As one trainer said, ‘This is real play, not role play.’ (Location 115)
  • Being on the receiving end of advice, however good or well-intentioned, didn’t feel good. Other people’s words of wisdom could actually feel oppressive. (Location 177)
  • Giving advice is rewarding. It is an opportunity to say things like, ‘What I always say is …’ or ‘One lesson I have learned …’, which make you feel capable, worldly-wise and generous. The idea of not giving advice left me feeling anxious and impotent. (Location 186)
  • An accurate summary can lead to a lightbulb moment (Location 270)
  • It is the coach’s job to be objective and non-judgemental, not to apportion praise or blame. (Location 283)
  • ‘I noticed that when you talked about the second option, your body language was more open and you seemed more animated.’ (Location 284)
  • The essence of metaphor is understanding and experiencing one kind of thing in terms of another. (Location 306)
  • The six principles of coaching 1  The client is resourceful 2  The coach’s role is to develop the client’s resourcefulness 3  Coaching addresses the whole person 4  The client sets the agenda 5  The coach and the client are equals 6  Coaching is about change and action (Rogers, 2012, with permission) (Location 315)
  • dysfunctional to functional. As Tom put it, the client seeking therapy had come to be ‘fixed’ whereas in coaching the basic assumption was that the client was OK and not in need of fixing. (Location 330)
  • One simple one was the IGROW model, i.e. Issue, Goal, Realities, Options, Will. (Location 371)
  • The only difficulty I had was the idea that the coach shouldn’t throw himself into the creativity alongside the client. (Location 376)
  • Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Resourced and completed in a specific Time. (Location 383)
  • The essential difference between emotion and reason is that emotion leads to action while reason leads to conclusions. (Location 401)
  • Magic questions What is the issue? What makes it an issue now? Who owns the issue? How important is the issue on a 1–10 scale? How much energy do you have for a solution on a 1–10 scale? What are the implications of doing nothing? What have you already tried? Imagine the problem has been solved. What would you see, hear and feel? What is standing in the way of that ideal outcome? What’s your own responsibility for what’s been happening? What early signs are there that things might be getting better/going all right? Imagine you’re at your most resourceful. What do you say to yourself about this issue? What are the options for action here? What criteria will you use to judge the options? Which option seems the best one against those criteria? So what’s the next/first step? When will you take it? (Location 409)
  • Taking an interest in all this made it clear that you were interested in the client as a whole person, and that could set the scene for a much richer coaching relationship. (Location 639)
  • He went on to say that I should stick to my principles that a coaching relationship is one between equals and the client is not in need of fixing. In this case, Catriona had chosen, as an autonomous adult, to seek coaching with me. (Location 703)

public: true

title: New Coach longtitle: New Coach author: Lis Paice url: , source: kindle last_highlight: 2023-09-20 type: books tags:

New Coach

rw-book-cover

Metadata

  • Author: Lis Paice
  • Full Title: New Coach
  • Category: #books

Highlights

  • As one trainer said, ‘This is real play, not role play.’ (Location 115)
  • Being on the receiving end of advice, however good or well-intentioned, didn’t feel good. Other people’s words of wisdom could actually feel oppressive. (Location 177)
  • Giving advice is rewarding. It is an opportunity to say things like, ‘What I always say is …’ or ‘One lesson I have learned …’, which make you feel capable, worldly-wise and generous. The idea of not giving advice left me feeling anxious and impotent. (Location 186)
  • An accurate summary can lead to a lightbulb moment (Location 270)
  • It is the coach’s job to be objective and non-judgemental, not to apportion praise or blame. (Location 283)
  • ‘I noticed that when you talked about the second option, your body language was more open and you seemed more animated.’ (Location 284)
  • The essence of metaphor is understanding and experiencing one kind of thing in terms of another. (Location 306)
  • The six principles of coaching 1  The client is resourceful 2  The coach’s role is to develop the client’s resourcefulness 3  Coaching addresses the whole person 4  The client sets the agenda 5  The coach and the client are equals 6  Coaching is about change and action (Rogers, 2012, with permission) (Location 315)
  • dysfunctional to functional. As Tom put it, the client seeking therapy had come to be ‘fixed’ whereas in coaching the basic assumption was that the client was OK and not in need of fixing. (Location 330)
  • One simple one was the IGROW model, i.e. Issue, Goal, Realities, Options, Will. (Location 371)
  • The only difficulty I had was the idea that the coach shouldn’t throw himself into the creativity alongside the client. (Location 376)
  • Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Resourced and completed in a specific Time. (Location 383)
  • The essential difference between emotion and reason is that emotion leads to action while reason leads to conclusions. (Location 401)
  • Magic questions What is the issue? What makes it an issue now? Who owns the issue? How important is the issue on a 1–10 scale? How much energy do you have for a solution on a 1–10 scale? What are the implications of doing nothing? What have you already tried? Imagine the problem has been solved. What would you see, hear and feel? What is standing in the way of that ideal outcome? What’s your own responsibility for what’s been happening? What early signs are there that things might be getting better/going all right? Imagine you’re at your most resourceful. What do you say to yourself about this issue? What are the options for action here? What criteria will you use to judge the options? Which option seems the best one against those criteria? So what’s the next/first step? When will you take it? (Location 409)
  • Taking an interest in all this made it clear that you were interested in the client as a whole person, and that could set the scene for a much richer coaching relationship. (Location 639)
  • He went on to say that I should stick to my principles that a coaching relationship is one between equals and the client is not in need of fixing. In this case, Catriona had chosen, as an autonomous adult, to seek coaching with me. (Location 703)