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Music Theory for Electronic Music Producers

Music Theory for Electronic Music Producers

Metadata

  • Author: J. Anthony Allen
  • Full Title: Music Theory for Electronic Music Producers
  • Category: #books

Highlights

  • There are more - many more - ratios when we start talking about intervals. The thing to keep in mind is that "easy" ratios tend to sound good, and "odd" ratios tend to sound dissonant. We can loosely define "easy" ratios as ratios that when divided end in a whole number or close to it. For example: an octave, 2:1 (2 divided by 1 = 2) is a whole number, so it will sound good, while the ratio of 8:7 (8 divided by 7 = 1.14285714) will be a more dissonant sound. (Location 375)
  • The most important thing to remember from this chapter is that Octaves always sound good. Whenever you have a riff, pattern, or chord that you want to make "thicker", add an octave to it. (Location 400)
  • If you have a single note, but you want it to sound stronger, meatier, and more forceful, try putting a fifth on it. (Location 406)
  • We usually describe intervals by saying their name (5th) and their quality (perfect). Some intervals can have multiple qualities. For example, when we look at the interval of a 3rd third, we will find that the 3rd has two different qualities it can be: Major or Minor. From a technical perspective, the quality of an interval usually translates to how many half-steps are in it. A major 3rd is four half steps apart, and a minor 3rd is only three. (Location 416)
  • Unlike 3rds, the interval of a 5th only has one quality [1]. You could say that it does not have the option of being major or minor - it is perfect just the way it is. (Location 420)

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title: Music Theory for Electronic Music Producers longtitle: Music Theory for Electronic Music Producers author: J. Anthony Allen url: , source: kindle last_highlight: 2023-05-17 type: books tags:

Music Theory for Electronic Music Producers

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Metadata

  • Author: J. Anthony Allen
  • Full Title: Music Theory for Electronic Music Producers
  • Category: #books

Highlights

  • There are more - many more - ratios when we start talking about intervals. The thing to keep in mind is that "easy" ratios tend to sound good, and "odd" ratios tend to sound dissonant. We can loosely define "easy" ratios as ratios that when divided end in a whole number or close to it. For example: an octave, 2:1 (2 divided by 1 = 2) is a whole number, so it will sound good, while the ratio of 8:7 (8 divided by 7 = 1.14285714) will be a more dissonant sound. (Location 375)
  • The most important thing to remember from this chapter is that Octaves always sound good. Whenever you have a riff, pattern, or chord that you want to make "thicker", add an octave to it. (Location 400)
  • If you have a single note, but you want it to sound stronger, meatier, and more forceful, try putting a fifth on it. (Location 406)
  • We usually describe intervals by saying their name (5th) and their quality (perfect). Some intervals can have multiple qualities. For example, when we look at the interval of a 3rd third, we will find that the 3rd has two different qualities it can be: Major or Minor. From a technical perspective, the quality of an interval usually translates to how many half-steps are in it. A major 3rd is four half steps apart, and a minor 3rd is only three. (Location 416)
  • Unlike 3rds, the interval of a 5th only has one quality [1]. You could say that it does not have the option of being major or minor - it is perfect just the way it is. (Location 420)