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Chip War

Chip War

Metadata

  • Author: Chris Miller
  • Full Title: Chip War
  • Category: #books

Highlights

  • China now spends more money each year importing chips than it spends on oil. (Location 107)
  • “Malacca Dilemma”—a reference to the main shipping channel between the Pacific and Indian Oceans—and (Location 109)
  • China is devoting its best minds and billions of dollars to developing its own semiconductor technology in a bid to free itself from America’s chip choke. (Location 111)
  • Fabricating and miniaturizing semiconductors has been the greatest engineering challenge of our time. Today, no firm fabricates chips with more precision than the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, better known as TSMC. (Location 136)
  • Chips from Taiwan provide 37 percent of the world’s new computing power each year. Two Korean companies produce 44 percent of the world’s memory chips. The Dutch company ASML builds 100 percent of the world’s extreme ultraviolet lithography machines, without which cutting-edge chips are simply impossible to make. OPEC’s 40 percent share of world oil production looks unimpressive by comparison. (Location 206)
  • Morris Chang was born in mainland China; grew up in World War II−era Hong Kong; was educated at Harvard, MIT, and Stanford; helped build America’s early chip industry while working for Texas Instruments in Dallas; held a top secret U.S. security clearance to develop electronics for the American military; and made Taiwan the epicenter of world semiconductor manufacturing. (Location 220)
  • A single missile strike on TSMC’s most advanced chip fabrication facility could easily cause hundreds of billions of dollars of damage once delays to the production of phones, data centers, autos, telecom networks, and other technology are added up. (Location 227)
  • Akio Morita, however, was in his early twenties and had spent the final months of the war developing heat-seeking missiles. (Location 281)
  • the demand for calculations kept growing. (Location 298)
  • Shockley was furious that his colleagues had discovered an experiment to prove his theories, and he was committed to outdoing them. He locked himself in a Chicago hotel room for two weeks over Christmas and began imagining different transistor structures, based on his unparalleled understanding of semiconductor physics. (Location 357)
  • Kilby called his invention an “integrated circuit,” but it became known colloquially as a “chip,” because each integrated circuit was made from a piece of silicon “chipped” off a circular silicon wafer. (Location 399)
  • Could they use a lens to take a big pattern and “print” it onto germanium, thereby making miniature mesas on their blocks of germanium? Kodak, the camera company, sold chemicals called photoresists, which reacted when exposed to light. (Location 501)
  • “Our plan is to lead the public with new products rather than ask them what kind of products they want,” Morita declared. “The public does not know what is possible, but we do.” (Location 811)
  • Silicon Valley’s salesmen were never allowed to wine and dine him. “Sometimes I let them take me out to lunch,” he admitted sheepishly. But the entire valley knew that he was the gatekeeper to almost everyone’s most important customer. His job gave him a panoramic view of the semiconductor industry, including how each company was (Location 1205)

public: true

title: Chip War longtitle: Chip War author: Chris Miller url: , source: kindle last_highlight: 2023-07-28 type: books tags:

Chip War

rw-book-cover

Metadata

  • Author: Chris Miller
  • Full Title: Chip War
  • Category: #books

Highlights

  • China now spends more money each year importing chips than it spends on oil. (Location 107)
  • “Malacca Dilemma”—a reference to the main shipping channel between the Pacific and Indian Oceans—and (Location 109)
  • China is devoting its best minds and billions of dollars to developing its own semiconductor technology in a bid to free itself from America’s chip choke. (Location 111)
  • Fabricating and miniaturizing semiconductors has been the greatest engineering challenge of our time. Today, no firm fabricates chips with more precision than the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, better known as TSMC. (Location 136)
  • Chips from Taiwan provide 37 percent of the world’s new computing power each year. Two Korean companies produce 44 percent of the world’s memory chips. The Dutch company ASML builds 100 percent of the world’s extreme ultraviolet lithography machines, without which cutting-edge chips are simply impossible to make. OPEC’s 40 percent share of world oil production looks unimpressive by comparison. (Location 206)
  • Morris Chang was born in mainland China; grew up in World War II−era Hong Kong; was educated at Harvard, MIT, and Stanford; helped build America’s early chip industry while working for Texas Instruments in Dallas; held a top secret U.S. security clearance to develop electronics for the American military; and made Taiwan the epicenter of world semiconductor manufacturing. (Location 220)
  • A single missile strike on TSMC’s most advanced chip fabrication facility could easily cause hundreds of billions of dollars of damage once delays to the production of phones, data centers, autos, telecom networks, and other technology are added up. (Location 227)
  • Akio Morita, however, was in his early twenties and had spent the final months of the war developing heat-seeking missiles. (Location 281)
  • the demand for calculations kept growing. (Location 298)
  • Shockley was furious that his colleagues had discovered an experiment to prove his theories, and he was committed to outdoing them. He locked himself in a Chicago hotel room for two weeks over Christmas and began imagining different transistor structures, based on his unparalleled understanding of semiconductor physics. (Location 357)
  • Kilby called his invention an “integrated circuit,” but it became known colloquially as a “chip,” because each integrated circuit was made from a piece of silicon “chipped” off a circular silicon wafer. (Location 399)
  • Could they use a lens to take a big pattern and “print” it onto germanium, thereby making miniature mesas on their blocks of germanium? Kodak, the camera company, sold chemicals called photoresists, which reacted when exposed to light. (Location 501)
  • “Our plan is to lead the public with new products rather than ask them what kind of products they want,” Morita declared. “The public does not know what is possible, but we do.” (Location 811)
  • Silicon Valley’s salesmen were never allowed to wine and dine him. “Sometimes I let them take me out to lunch,” he admitted sheepishly. But the entire valley knew that he was the gatekeeper to almost everyone’s most important customer. His job gave him a panoramic view of the semiconductor industry, including how each company was (Location 1205)