andrewlb notes

Fashion History

Fashion History

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Highlights

  • Brydon and Niessen’s Consuming Fashion: Adorning the Transnational Body (1998) challenged the class, race, and economic dichotomies embedded within fashion theory. (Location 433)
  • In the twenty-first century, globalization has created what Hansen terms a “new world in dress” (Hansen 2004: 372). Australian Jennifer Craik raised the globalization issue in her two books on fashion (Craik 1994, 2009). Craik argued that the term “fashion” needs revision, that fashion systems operate globally, and that non-Western dress has its own fashion system. (Location 438)
  • Robert Ross (2008) and Margaret Maynard (2004) examined colonialism’s effects on the dress of the colonized. (Location 441)
    • Note: Clothing: A Global History
  • Sandra Niessen was one of the first to reimagine fashion history as global. In Re-Orienting Fashion (2003: 243), she expounded upon the problems inherent in separating the dress of the West from other dress systems and also the assignment of fashion only to Europe and its diaspora. (Location 448)
  • Toby Slade, writing about Japan, hoped to “demonstrate that there are other modernities, and different fashion histories beyond the canon of European and American dress narratives, which dominate nearly all interpretations of the practices, styles, institutions and hermeneutic structures of clothing in the modern age” (Slade 2009: 1). (Location 503)
  • There is a rage of fashion which prevails here with dispotick Sway, the colour and kind of silk must be attended to; and the day for putting it on and off, no fancy to be exercised, but it is the fashion, and that is argument sufficient to put one in, or out of countenance. ABIGAIL ADAMS ON FASHIONABLE DRESS IN LONDON (Location 613)

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title: Fashion History longtitle: Fashion History author: Linda Welters and Abby Lillethun url: , source: kindle last_highlight: 2020-09-27 type: books tags:

Fashion History

rw-book-cover

Metadata

Highlights

  • Brydon and Niessen’s Consuming Fashion: Adorning the Transnational Body (1998) challenged the class, race, and economic dichotomies embedded within fashion theory. (Location 433)
  • In the twenty-first century, globalization has created what Hansen terms a “new world in dress” (Hansen 2004: 372). Australian Jennifer Craik raised the globalization issue in her two books on fashion (Craik 1994, 2009). Craik argued that the term “fashion” needs revision, that fashion systems operate globally, and that non-Western dress has its own fashion system. (Location 438)
  • Robert Ross (2008) and Margaret Maynard (2004) examined colonialism’s effects on the dress of the colonized. (Location 441)
    • Note: Clothing: A Global History
  • Sandra Niessen was one of the first to reimagine fashion history as global. In Re-Orienting Fashion (2003: 243), she expounded upon the problems inherent in separating the dress of the West from other dress systems and also the assignment of fashion only to Europe and its diaspora. (Location 448)
  • Toby Slade, writing about Japan, hoped to “demonstrate that there are other modernities, and different fashion histories beyond the canon of European and American dress narratives, which dominate nearly all interpretations of the practices, styles, institutions and hermeneutic structures of clothing in the modern age” (Slade 2009: 1). (Location 503)
  • There is a rage of fashion which prevails here with dispotick Sway, the colour and kind of silk must be attended to; and the day for putting it on and off, no fancy to be exercised, but it is the fashion, and that is argument sufficient to put one in, or out of countenance. ABIGAIL ADAMS ON FASHIONABLE DRESS IN LONDON (Location 613)