andrewlb notes

Good Clean Fun

Good Clean Fun

Metadata

  • Author: Nick Offerman
  • Full Title: Good Clean Fun
  • Category: #books

Highlights

  • (It occurs to me to mention here two books by Jan Adkins that I love for their brilliant simplicity and artistic presentation: Line: Tying It Up, Tying It Down and Moving Heavy Things—these volumes have been invaluable in helping me remember the old-fashioned ways people have historically moved things like blocks for the pyramids or a massive planer.) (Location 348)
  • Christian Becksvoort article; so if it’s good enough for the modern master of the Shaker style, it’s plenty fine for (Location 661)
  • If you can afford only one really nice chisel, shell out for a ½" or a ¾" bench chisel and learn to properly sharpen it. Once you have experienced the power that a sharp chisel affords the woodworker—kid, you will be hooked. Whether you’re paring a fine shaving from a tenon’s cheek (bevel up) or gouging out a large waste area on a canoe paddle (bevel down), the chisel is your best buddy, good buddy. (Location 690)
  • Sorry, pine, but I’ll line up around the block for the species commonly known as the cabinet woods. Cherry, walnut, oak, maple, and mahogany are the starting five, but nearby on (and in) the bench you’ll find beech, birch, ash, hickory, chestnut, and butternut, and in California we have some local beauties like black acacia, madrone, and eucalyptus (frequently a bad seed, but tragically beautiful, as is so often the case with troublemakers). (Location 909)
  • It’s worth noting that he’s not actually complimenting my tool skills, but rather my ever-burgeoning understanding that there is nothing I can do in the shop that will be more impressive and artistic than what Mother Nature has wrought within the wood itself. A successful design (I think) is one that gets out of the way of her magic, because the natural beauty of the wood will always earn more “oohs” and “oh mys” than my band saw feats, however nimble they may be. (Location 923)
  • Sweden’s Sloyd school (slöjd is Swedish for “craft” or “manual skill”) to sail over to the States and establish a similar program at her school in Boston. The original Swedish school had been developed because it was felt that “the general skill level of the population was declining due to the availability of ready-made objects.” Um, this was in the 1880s, gang. (Location 3186)

public: true

title: Good Clean Fun longtitle: Good Clean Fun author: Nick Offerman url: , source: kindle last_highlight: 2018-05-30 type: books tags:

Good Clean Fun

rw-book-cover

Metadata

  • Author: Nick Offerman
  • Full Title: Good Clean Fun
  • Category: #books

Highlights

  • (It occurs to me to mention here two books by Jan Adkins that I love for their brilliant simplicity and artistic presentation: Line: Tying It Up, Tying It Down and Moving Heavy Things—these volumes have been invaluable in helping me remember the old-fashioned ways people have historically moved things like blocks for the pyramids or a massive planer.) (Location 348)
  • Christian Becksvoort article; so if it’s good enough for the modern master of the Shaker style, it’s plenty fine for (Location 661)
  • If you can afford only one really nice chisel, shell out for a ½" or a ¾" bench chisel and learn to properly sharpen it. Once you have experienced the power that a sharp chisel affords the woodworker—kid, you will be hooked. Whether you’re paring a fine shaving from a tenon’s cheek (bevel up) or gouging out a large waste area on a canoe paddle (bevel down), the chisel is your best buddy, good buddy. (Location 690)
  • Sorry, pine, but I’ll line up around the block for the species commonly known as the cabinet woods. Cherry, walnut, oak, maple, and mahogany are the starting five, but nearby on (and in) the bench you’ll find beech, birch, ash, hickory, chestnut, and butternut, and in California we have some local beauties like black acacia, madrone, and eucalyptus (frequently a bad seed, but tragically beautiful, as is so often the case with troublemakers). (Location 909)
  • It’s worth noting that he’s not actually complimenting my tool skills, but rather my ever-burgeoning understanding that there is nothing I can do in the shop that will be more impressive and artistic than what Mother Nature has wrought within the wood itself. A successful design (I think) is one that gets out of the way of her magic, because the natural beauty of the wood will always earn more “oohs” and “oh mys” than my band saw feats, however nimble they may be. (Location 923)
  • Sweden’s Sloyd school (slöjd is Swedish for “craft” or “manual skill”) to sail over to the States and establish a similar program at her school in Boston. The original Swedish school had been developed because it was felt that “the general skill level of the population was declining due to the availability of ready-made objects.” Um, this was in the 1880s, gang. (Location 3186)