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Design for Care

Design for Care

Metadata

  • Author: Peter Jones
  • Full Title: Design for Care
  • Category: #books

Highlights

  • People with chronic health concerns such as diabetes need continuous feedback. Those in “normal” health may find health feedback only marginally helpful. (Location 346)
  • By repositioning the individual health seeker as a deciding and knowing agent of his or her own experience, health services can be designed to facilitate a whole-person approach to health. (Location 364)
  • A person is a patient for a limited period, but the experience of seeking health is a continuous process throughout life. Care providers and resources can help restore natural and supported functions of life. (Location 365)
    • Note: baseline
  • Health journeys are self-educating—people evolve as they learn in stages of struggle, understanding, acceptance, and self-management. (Location 371)
  • Healthcare is a large-scale distributed system dedicated to serving individuals with health needs but who are not the paying customer. This is a classic dilemma of service and experience design: the patient (the end user) has little decision-making power but a life-critical need; the institutional customer (who pays) has significant power but little understanding of need. (Location 527)
  • Critiquing the consumer persona or mindset frees up the capacity to innovate with fresh perspectives. Human health is not the result of a service transaction; rather, it flourishes in the context of care, drawing on personal, familial, professional, and community resources. (Location 557)
  • Do not lose sight of the seemingly minor inconveniences; frustration is one of the leading causes of innovation. Frustrations with wayfinding, communications, or documentation may reveal underlying systemic causes that have been completely overlooked. (Location 661)
  • Future healthcare problems are not solved by the introduction of a better user experience. (Location 674)
  • Not all “systems” in healthcare are computer-based; the technical work of care is performed as a hands-on human process. Diagnosis, treatment, procedures, aftercare, and care planning are not (yet) automated, and the human-to-human relationship of care never will be. (Location 693)
  • Simple problems are those situations with a clear cause and a reliable response in most cases. In healthcare, these include well-understood routine conditions such as broken bones and lacerations. Many more health concerns are complicated, requiring iterative tests and observations. Surgical operations are complicated, with many moving parts and many ways to fail. Complex problems are interconnected and entangled issues with uncertain outcomes. Chronic, interacting diseases are complex, such as asthma, allergies, and many cancers or autoimmune diseases. Wicked problems are complex problems with uncertain interventions as well as uncertain outcomes. These can range from healthcare system reform to facial pain management. (Location 713)
  • Design theorist Richard Buchanan’s orders of design is an influential schema for problem framing, as well a definitive reference to the contemporary view of design thinking. (Location 725)
  • Designers and strategists Garry VanPatter and Elizabeth Pastor defined design geographies—four essentially different design domains, Design 1.0 through 4.0, that represent an evolution of design practice, research, and education to develop new knowledge bases necessary for increasing complexity (Figure 1.1).7 (Location 737)
  • Sensemaking, considered here the consensual understanding of the functions of a problem area, becomes a critical requirement in situations of high complexity (D3.0 and D4.0). In a social design process, multiple stakeholders, managers, and experts come to agreement or make sense of the situation together. (Location 793)
  • Strange-making is a process of differentiating form to capture attention. It consumes the larger proportion of D1.0 and D2.0, where novelty and provocation is expected for product design, commercial communications, or sophisticated Web services. (Location 795)
  • Few design projects are defined at the level of D4.0, but some organizations face challenges that are better framed this way. The strategies of top clinics and diversified organizations such as Kaiser Permanente reach beyond the organizational boundaries to government, universities, patient groups, and clinical research, expanding the boundaries of design. They are not solely organizational programs, and can be facilitated as multistakeholder social systems problems. (Location 811)
  • His proposition was that designerly thinking afforded ways of flexibly addressing intractable (wicked) design problems through a creative process of shifting solutions through the levels he called placements. (Location 821)
  • The convergence of design research, service and UX design, and human factors has led to fusions of practice and methods. Designing for care helps improve the experience of being human, and not necessarily the user experience. (Location 841)
  • The health seeker is a person acting on the intention to pursue or sustain health, and health seeking is a purposeful activity that aims to restore or improve health. (Location 924)
  • Then their health-seeking journey begins by recognition of a knowledge gap, or need for further understanding, a health information need. (Location 929)

public: true

title: Design for Care longtitle: Design for Care author: Peter Jones url: , source: kindle last_highlight: 2016-06-04 type: books tags:

Design for Care

rw-book-cover

Metadata

  • Author: Peter Jones
  • Full Title: Design for Care
  • Category: #books

Highlights

  • People with chronic health concerns such as diabetes need continuous feedback. Those in “normal” health may find health feedback only marginally helpful. (Location 346)
  • By repositioning the individual health seeker as a deciding and knowing agent of his or her own experience, health services can be designed to facilitate a whole-person approach to health. (Location 364)
  • A person is a patient for a limited period, but the experience of seeking health is a continuous process throughout life. Care providers and resources can help restore natural and supported functions of life. (Location 365)
    • Note: baseline
  • Health journeys are self-educating—people evolve as they learn in stages of struggle, understanding, acceptance, and self-management. (Location 371)
  • Healthcare is a large-scale distributed system dedicated to serving individuals with health needs but who are not the paying customer. This is a classic dilemma of service and experience design: the patient (the end user) has little decision-making power but a life-critical need; the institutional customer (who pays) has significant power but little understanding of need. (Location 527)
  • Critiquing the consumer persona or mindset frees up the capacity to innovate with fresh perspectives. Human health is not the result of a service transaction; rather, it flourishes in the context of care, drawing on personal, familial, professional, and community resources. (Location 557)
  • Do not lose sight of the seemingly minor inconveniences; frustration is one of the leading causes of innovation. Frustrations with wayfinding, communications, or documentation may reveal underlying systemic causes that have been completely overlooked. (Location 661)
  • Future healthcare problems are not solved by the introduction of a better user experience. (Location 674)
  • Not all “systems” in healthcare are computer-based; the technical work of care is performed as a hands-on human process. Diagnosis, treatment, procedures, aftercare, and care planning are not (yet) automated, and the human-to-human relationship of care never will be. (Location 693)
  • Simple problems are those situations with a clear cause and a reliable response in most cases. In healthcare, these include well-understood routine conditions such as broken bones and lacerations. Many more health concerns are complicated, requiring iterative tests and observations. Surgical operations are complicated, with many moving parts and many ways to fail. Complex problems are interconnected and entangled issues with uncertain outcomes. Chronic, interacting diseases are complex, such as asthma, allergies, and many cancers or autoimmune diseases. Wicked problems are complex problems with uncertain interventions as well as uncertain outcomes. These can range from healthcare system reform to facial pain management. (Location 713)
  • Design theorist Richard Buchanan’s orders of design is an influential schema for problem framing, as well a definitive reference to the contemporary view of design thinking. (Location 725)
  • Designers and strategists Garry VanPatter and Elizabeth Pastor defined design geographies—four essentially different design domains, Design 1.0 through 4.0, that represent an evolution of design practice, research, and education to develop new knowledge bases necessary for increasing complexity (Figure 1.1).7 (Location 737)
  • Sensemaking, considered here the consensual understanding of the functions of a problem area, becomes a critical requirement in situations of high complexity (D3.0 and D4.0). In a social design process, multiple stakeholders, managers, and experts come to agreement or make sense of the situation together. (Location 793)
  • Strange-making is a process of differentiating form to capture attention. It consumes the larger proportion of D1.0 and D2.0, where novelty and provocation is expected for product design, commercial communications, or sophisticated Web services. (Location 795)
  • Few design projects are defined at the level of D4.0, but some organizations face challenges that are better framed this way. The strategies of top clinics and diversified organizations such as Kaiser Permanente reach beyond the organizational boundaries to government, universities, patient groups, and clinical research, expanding the boundaries of design. They are not solely organizational programs, and can be facilitated as multistakeholder social systems problems. (Location 811)
  • His proposition was that designerly thinking afforded ways of flexibly addressing intractable (wicked) design problems through a creative process of shifting solutions through the levels he called placements. (Location 821)
  • The convergence of design research, service and UX design, and human factors has led to fusions of practice and methods. Designing for care helps improve the experience of being human, and not necessarily the user experience. (Location 841)
  • The health seeker is a person acting on the intention to pursue or sustain health, and health seeking is a purposeful activity that aims to restore or improve health. (Location 924)
  • Then their health-seeking journey begins by recognition of a knowledge gap, or need for further understanding, a health information need. (Location 929)